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20121214
20121214
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obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, bo
. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it because the demand side, as we were talking about it, will be there because there is going to be someone there. there have to be people working with it who are getting out there. i think this is what this city is going to be really powerful. in terms of other cities doing as well, chicago is doing some really interesting stuff. scary cool stuff. they're taking 3 in 1 data, pothole request and crime report and matching it up with social media. t
. if you're looking for a park or if you're not familiar with any of the parks here in the city are, this app is a perfect accessory. so we're basically zooming in on the map right now. you can see the clustering 2 12 parks. as you get closer in, it lets you know where you're at. i'll zoom in on a park. you can see many different parks here. if you go to dolores, we'll start to see all of the facilities that they have available. looks like there's a tennis court, a dog play area, some children's park play areas. and if you actually go into one of the children's play area maybe, you can see some details about it. any news about each of the parks is going to be referenced here through a feed. ability to donate to the rec and park. let's say a ballfield, you'd be getting ballfield information. if there's close out based on rain. and you can do some filtering, spot-check the filtering real quick. this is what's near right now. filter, we've got, i don't know, what is it, over 10 categories, maybe closer to 20. and basically anything you're looking for, you can turn on right here. for me
on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your
development lead intion mayor lee's program look tog coordinate city resources both existing and new to serve our neighborhoods in need and to serve our small business commercial corridors. one of the things that has been so important to the mayor is making sure that we're attentive and listening to the streets and there is certainly no one better to know that than mayor lee who has been both our director of public works, then moved on to being city administrator, and now our mayor of our city. so, to make the announcement of this new program that will benefit merchants and small businesses up and down corridors like the one we're here on today, i'd like to invite further direction, mayor lee. thank you, mayor. (applause) >> thank you. it's great to be out here in sunset out in irving street. i should come out here every week, the dpw folk are cleaning the streets pretty well. [laughter] >> it's great to see all of you here today. you know, earlier this year, particularly during the budget negotiations, supervisor carmen chu and i and a number of other supervisors engaged in a lot of discussi
from the restaurant association, benny yee to being here, our merchants, our neighbors and all the city partners who really believe in supporting the businesses and of course to todd from the office of economic and work force development, supervisor chu and our mayor ed lee. thank you so much for this opportunity to help out our small businesses in our community. thank you very much and we'll be available for questions later on. thanks. (applause) ... >> good afternoon, everyone, almost good evening, and welcome to san francisco city hall. i'm supervisor scott wiener. i have the honor of representing district 8 including the castro on the board of supervisors. and which district are formerly represented by harvey milk. supervisor olague likes to remind me we share the district 5 represented by milk. and we're here today to remember supervisor harvey milk and mayor george moscone who were brutally assassinated decades ago. and we gather every year to remember, and not just to remember and to mourn, but also to remember the positives and to remember frankly both of these great men and wha
a matter can be solved with an enlightened church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san francisco play miami excited who will win that game. of the tens of thousands that watch those games those role models on the field are not ministers. those athletes have a role to play in diffusing this crisis in our culture. those that do music and art and attract by the thousands. we pay to hear them sing and watch them perform. they must lift their art above deck dance and inspire and something blowing in the wind and can't recycle our worse fears. our nation has become much too violent. we're the most violent nation on earth. we make of the most guns and we shoot them. we make the most bombs and we drop them. in this state unions larger than the teacher union and building first class jails and second class schools and [inaudible] stop the problem. each out and convene the family is the first step in the right direction. mr. mayor a
. these are the folks that we are most thankful for because they give us purpose, and focus for this city and where we need to take it. that is why we build more parks and we invest in our open space. it is for all of these children and the families. i also want to thank all of the sponsors i know three of them are big sports sponsors in the city. and the reflected by the toy train that you see on the side. you will see the caboose, led by golden state warriors. followed by the 49ers. [ applause ] and then two-time world series champions, san francisco giants. [ applause ] >> they give us all of this inspiration and i know that we are looking at some of future players on these teams right here in front of us. so thank you everybody. if i may, during these happy times, when we are thankful for the things that we have and giving thanks for it, please remember the victims that continue to suffer on the east coast. and they are having a hard time it is very cold over there do anything that you can to help them. there are fellow citizens, they all wish that they could be here tonight. i am absolutely sure
was fascinated by chinatown and it's next to the old italian neighborhood of north beach and in the great cities like boston et cetera and when i walked around that neighborhood it was the neighborhood that drew me to the great city whether being reminded of great baseball players, the joe migage i don't play ground. >> >> or the fisherman or the piazza that i look forward to work with angela to lobby the mayor to adequately fund it. there are special quarters that come from the community that are represented tonight and i am happy to come and raise a glass to all of you and look forward to cel celebrating the italian. >> american history. thank you. >> good evening. i am verna patty. i am coming from congresswoman pelosi's office. she is celebrating in washington dc the italian culture with the minister. "dr. friends greetings as you. >> >> gather in san francisco to celebrate italian culture in the united states. thank you for the opportunity to join so many friends, guests and dignitaries with fellow italian americans to bring the celebrations. the celebration is more of a celebration
city public elementary school. and we have a little boy who is 4 years old going to preschool and if we stay in the city, he will be going to the same school as our daughters. so we have been renting in the city for ten years. last year, around this time of year we bought 27-29 sutro with the hope that we can build a home for ourselves and to raise a family in the city. as property owners we understand the requirement when we purchased the two units that we have to maintain the number of units and cannot combine them and cannot reduce footage. so we worked with the architects to meet the city requirements. we are the new family on the block and don't want to be in conflict with our neighbors and we're putting in tremendous time and effort and money to address neighbors' requests to the point that nothing we can do to make the project viable. if you can see the plans is not to build a luxury home, to indulge ourselves, but simply to be the family of two parents and four children, so we can grow as a family and raise our children in the family and maybe we can finally give our
to talk about, i'm strictly a push to talk guy. we know as a city when the earth moves, things fall, we get a lot of rubble. that's going to be one of our critical, critical things we have to do. we have to be able to move material and personnel and one of the ways we're going to be doing that is how do we actually get the debris off the road so we can put things back to work. so that was the command of control exercise. we had the marine corps, the navy, and the national guard all working with our department of public works figuring out how would they work together. we didn't give them a lot of coaching, we just kind of put them in a tent and said here is your scenario, here's some problems, and we wanted them to work it out and they did. so it was a very successful year. that's what we did as far as the field exercises. next year i don't know what's next, we're going to explore the lessons learned from this one, we've already learned a bunch, they're going to talk about this shortly then learn what are the next scenarios we can challenge people with. it probably won't be the same
to be treasures to san francisco, to our city, to our state, and to our nation. and i was so impressed yesterday that both of them intently sat here yesterday taking it all in. and it was the highlight really i think of the seminar to have the evening closing remarks capped off by former secretary of state george schultz. so, thank you very much, sir, for being here. (applause) >> it is a wonderful partnership that he shares with his wife who is chief of protocol for our city and our state, charlotte schultz. so, thank you very much. (applause) >> certainly this partnership couldn't take place without all of the heavy lifting and hard work done by the san francisco fleet week association. so, thank you to general myatt for your vision. this is your three of not only the celebration events, but what you spoke to earlier. also the executive director of the fleet week association lewis lubin. thank you very much. (applause) >> i've had the pleasure of serving in the san francisco fire department for 22 years. it will benign years in nine since i stepped up and took the role of chief of the departme
of it it means to get deeper affordable, . >> i'm sorry, deputy city attorney susan cleveland knowles, just to correct one thing mr. adams just said, the current code does not provides that if you are doing a tax-exempt project you are not subject to the inclusionary housing program at all. the ordinance that you will hear in your next item puts the tax exemption projects back within the rubric and provides an exemption to what mr. adams stated. gemly you are not allowed to use subsidized units for your inclusionary units unless you are a california debt limit allocation project using 4% credits. so that will be in your next all right, but it's also reflected in this new procedures manual. so it's a small technicality, but for some projects, you will be able to have a slight subsidy, but you have to provide more units at deeper affordable. >> commissioner borden? >> i wanted to thank you -- i was one of the commissioners who asked for a lot of this data and i do hope that you work more around the issue that you talk you ed about. it seems like that fica score issue would be a problem a
in which we are going to be welcoming cities from all over the country to learn how we do it here in san francisco. and then, just last month, and a big thank you to all of you, san francisco voters approved proposition b. the cleanest safe neighborhood parks fund which allows us to renovate and juvinate your parks. 83 years ago, uncle john mcclarin and if you go in the gm office you can see a picture of him. started the tradition of lighting this mile-long stretch of trees started and ending here in front of the lodge where he lived for a number of years. so this, this is san francisco official holiday tree right behind us, uncle john's tree. it is a cyrus that is more than 100 years old closer to 130 years old and tonight it sports over 550 christmas holiday lights. >> so i really want to give a big shout out to the rec and parks staff that has continued the tradition and i want to thank all of them and single out a few, bob pelosio who organized tonight's event. and i also want to single out loranie bamford whose team put this on and our entire recreation staff. and i want to thank ou
these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called hiresf.org and share the technology to hire online send franciscans. we're doing the right here in our great city. i have a chief innovation officer, jane, who is working in my office. he keeps a good connection for both me and them members of the board of supervisors to share
first adopted in 1996 and at that time the requirements were only applied to city-owned and leased buildings. the requirements were expanded on basis to city-owned and privately-owned garages in 1998 and to commercial and industrial uses in 2001 and residential uses in 2005 and hotel uses most recently in 2012. now i'm going to look at how our proposal would update the requirements. this proposal would include several requirements based on two bicycle typing types, class 1 and class 2 class 1 bicycle parking is secured, indoor parking targeted for long-term use usually by residents or employees. class 2 targeted short-term use, usually for visitors and can be located indoor or outdoor. requirements would require calibrating parking requirements based on the characteristic of use. for example, office uses will have more employees than visitors, than the requirement for class 1 will be higher. for personal services such as a gym, there would be more visitors and employees and class 2 requirements would be higher. our proposal would overall increase bicycle parking requirements. forr
you're adding to the city wide resiliency. >> >> what does that mean? >> that's a great question. what spur has done is look at that in terms of recovery and in new orleans with katrina and lost many of the people, hasn't recovered the building stock. it's not a good situation. i think we can agree and in san we want to rebuild well and quickly after a major disaster so we have defined what that means for our life lines. how do we need the gasolines to perform and water perform after an earthquake and the building stock as well, so we have the goal of 95% of our homes to be ready for shelter in place after a major earthquake, and that way people can stay within the city. we don't lose our work force. we don't lose the people that make san francisco so special. we keep everybody here and that allow us to recover our economy, and everything because it's so interdependent. >> so that is a difficult goal but i think we can achieve it over the long time so thank you very much for hosting us and hosting this great exhibit, and thank you very much for joining >> my name is phil ginsburg and
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we hav
'll be happy to take them. response and recovery. and the moderator for this panel is the city administrator for the city and county of san francisco, naomi kelly. please help me welcome naomi kelly. (applause). >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for having me here today. again, i'm naomi kelly, city administrator for the city and county of san francisco and it's an honor to be participating in this important panel discussion on the uss macon island. over the course of the next 50 minutes, we will be going to focus one of our -- we're going to be focused on one of the most important elements of our city and that's the resill yepbs of our life line. i am joined by a prestigious panel of experts who i believe have a keen insight sbat resill yepbs of the capacities we will be relying on heavily in moving forward post a disaster. here with me today is kirk johnson, to my left, vice president of gas transmissions from pacific gas and electric. next to him is don boland, executive director of california utilities emergency association. next to him is david brig, regional and local water
you mentioned this earlier, we assumed that all of the city's primary communications were online and operational. we used 800 megahertz push to talk radios here. we assumed that system was online and operational and i think next year it would be a really good exercise for us to pull that communications capability out of the picture and use military assets. i think we're going to have a lot of lessons learned out of that activity and it would be a good exercise for the city personnel to understand how they would operate using the military aid. >> i think one of the things that i wrote in my after action report it my boss was about training. we actually have an acu1,000 type capability in pendleton and that is a piece of equipment that bee don't train with routinely the expeditionary folks. i think there is an opportunity in training, it's great when marines get to see the gear and do that type of cross banding we spoke about. civilian authority operates in 700-800 megahertz range. we know fires happen a lot and we're often asked to support so training is a big recommendati
for the late evening. i am a third generation native san franciscan. as a native, i have seen our great city go through many changes and i know how difficult it to be people to see change ms. their neighbors. i am here to support polka dot, to make sure that changes are good for our community as a whole. my son graduated from polka dot and was very prepared when he entered school. my son is fourth-generation san franciscan. while growing up in the city with a working mom i was brought to our next door neighbor's house for home daycare. it was a wonderful experience for me to be close to home, in my neighborhood and run by a caring person who had kids of her own. it was also affordable. i know this many concerns have been expressed by neighbors and i'm glad that people have the forum to express their concerns. they are a strictly neighborhood residential street. their current location is small and on a really narrow street. and parking even there was never an issue. the school and parents are very respectful of people's driveways. traffic use -- typically they don't come at one time and the
the university mound in the district. i know it very well having raised kids in the city and playing games over there, particularly at st. elizabeth, which is unfortunatialy closed right now, but archdiocese continuing re-opening it. i appreciate all the testimony by the various neighbors and the opposition, but i don't see how the impact should be that great. you are talking about 20 children. they are going to be dropped off, presumably, about 8:00 a.m., maybe a little bit before or after and then picked up, most of them in the late afternoon about 4:30 or 5:00. and and i don't think having a school in an area necessarily degrades property values. my kids went to st. brendons and the school was built much later than the houses. and their property values continued to gain all the time, even though they have nine grades with 40 kids per grade as well as a gymnasium and i haven't heard any complaints from the neighborhoods. this is a much larger impact than what we're talking about here. it would seem as though this use, i don't think should be that much of a problem as along as the white zone i
in such and such city. so and so argued about who got what raise last year. here, a little bit different. here, medical resources and law enforcement are owned by the governor which, as established, comes from the turkish government. fire fighters and things like public works are owned by the municipality. let me tell you about budget discrepancies. the fire department, i got to tell you, when i went and i met with the fire chief, that one left a mark. their fire department was red tagged but they didn't have a place because it was so cold to house their engines because you can't leave diesel engines out in the cold, just doesn't work too well, so they still had to use the facility but they housed the personnel in two tents out in front. their headquarters is one tent and their dorm is another tent and they welcomed us in there, didn't even think twice. and in the story of what it was like there, for a community of nearly 700,000 people, their complete complement of fire fighters that were on duty, their professional staff, was just over 40. they had 4 pieces of apparatus. the newest of which was
, they are given back to the city who employs those as they think they need to be deployed because, again, they are the eyes and understand the local situation. i think going through this that the navy and the marine corps, we're used to being in charge whenever we show up and we're not going to be in this situation. i think it's important for us to understand that and we do and i think we, if we were employed in this certainly would understand that particular chain of command and would be able to fit right in and execute as required by the local situation. >> let me reiterate that the local authorities need to know that the emergency managers, the first responders, are there to be in charge to run things in their local disaster. everyone else that rolls in behind are there to enable them to do that, to manage to get back to normal so all the forces that roll in can finally leave. the emergency managers need to remain in control, they need to be situationally aware, they need to be in communicate with their forces, they need to understand what assets can become available as they need the
francisco and in the city and -- cities and states across the country, will create templates for success that organizations around the rest of the country can replicate in order to help their communities move online. and getting communities online is the reason that we are so invested in this effort. it is critical to our future, because broadband drives economic growth, and broadband creates jobs. it provides the infrastructure that communities need to attract innovative businesses in a competitive, global landscape. broadband also allows businesses of all sizes to reach markets around the world. people who are aging or disabled have unfortunately historically been at the margins of new technologies when they are introduced. today, as broadband internet brings expanded opportunities in health care, education, and civic participation, projects like this one here in san francisco are critical to making sure that all communities have access to life changing technologies. [applause] high-speed internet connections make it possible for patients in rural areas to consult with medical speciali
's heart and then he moves away towards the city hall of john's memory and john set the stairs in the way that george did, cocky and sexy, cruel as all get out. and then the song ends. and i notice the woman sitting next to me crying. and after the play is over, after the standing ovation of tony's brave and beautiful play, as people start to leave the theater, this woman, she remains in her chair and it seems she cannot move. i gently asked her if she's all right. and she nods. and she says without looking at me because she couldn't look at me, "i got to see my mayor again." so, maybe through art we can see again. about a month ago i braved going to the sf moment to check out the infamous bust of my dad and all i could remember growing up were the images of that controversial pedestal of gunshots and twinkies and don't think i didn't smile when i heard hostess went under. [laughter] (applause) but when i went to see the bust for that first time, a bust that i have to admit captured george's mile wide grin and dramatically imperfect teeth, i saw on the pedestal so many things that i didn'
households in the 0-50 ami is 52% city. african-american households, in the 0-50% ami and rental units it's about 12%. latino hispanic families, 14% citywide, about 20% in our rental units. the one ethnicity that is somewhat underrepresented is white. so that is about 39% citywide and 0-50 ami, and just about 14%. n our in our rental units. we don't have race and ethnicity for every single units. we have tried to collect it over the past five, six years. alt least it's a snapshot of our units. the number of households of color are overrepresented in the ownership, but the distribution is different than the rental side. on the ownership the number of asian families is a significant increase over the number of ami households would be in the 50-95% ami range. for that population, although asian-pacific islanders households comprise 28% of the 50-80 ami, they compose 60% of people that are in the ownership pool. african-americans are underrepresented, as are latino and hispanic families. african-americans are about 7% citywide in that demographic, just about 1%, very low number in our owners
cities. infrastructure regulations, you cannot build anything which is not 7.5, or less than a 7.5. if there is a mother who has no diapers and no food for their children, 24 hours and everything is, you know, no water, no nothing, people tend to go to a supermarket, absolutely broken, no one is in there, and start looting. so -- and it's something that you have to understand. so usually police, the armed forces time to react is very, very important. and in navy aspects we have a plan and we put that plan in effect and it works so it's very good, this kind of meetings because that is exactly what you are doing. naval effects as usual prove their flexibility and their capacity to remain in the affected areas for a long time without any logistical support so we can do a lot. that plan put the surface units in less than 24 hours. naval doctrine was highly effective. most of our ships -- the earthquake was at 3.34 and most of our ships get underway at about 4:00 or 4.10. one of them without a captain, he is not a captain any more, but all people get into the ship and ships get und
guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfer that to an air to air victor frequency. but from a command control perspective, we're fair
worked. he has ben in new york city, washington d.c., he has been in los angeles. probably the most interesting for me was the fact that he was in philadelphia for a number of years. we know in the department of aging and adult services that philadelphia has one of the most interesting and creative network of services for older adults in the country. it is really accessible to older adults. some of the most creative work we have seen at around the country. dave is also on the board of several civic organizations including the challengers boys and girls club, and cure autism now. edave -- dave, take it away. >> and good morning, can you hear me? in the back, can you hear me? i can see you. good morning, and thank you very much. if no one told you this morning, you look good today. you really do look good. in fact, you look just like i thought you would look on tv. i thank god for the opportunity to be with you for this very important conference. this is big. this is important. one of the things that she did not tell you about me that a lot of people don't know, not that you have to c
on the san andreas fault. we're working with other city departments so they know what to expect from us. it's been an education process. as we started down the road i think there was an expectation all water and sewer was going to be in operation in san francisco after an ert quake. that probably is not going to happen. it's a little bit different having several blocks in your population out of water versus out of electricity or gas or cell phone service. it's a little bit different level of emergency. after an earthquake what we're designing for is to have the high level fire system more or less immediately. there may be homes, individual service connections, which could be out of water for quite some time and that's where my utility has to interface with other departments to make sure we're getting water to people through humanitarian stations, red cross, mutual aid is a huge part of this with our federal and state partners. but those hand off points after a major event and educating ourselves what we're doing and not doing is a big part of the life line process that naomi is running
? there is a petition, signed by people all over the city, and? in the greater nob hill area and nobody nearby within a block or two blocks except one i see on the page. statements on the black, i want to change the verbiage from wine-tasting to wine bar. now you can say it doesn't add a bar, but it does really. he added a bar that wasn't supposed to be there. the police and abc objected to him having a later time on. it anyway, let me give you this. while he was adding entertainment and extending the time that i asked to have it investigated. christine hall responded this is the investigation of the violations and it doesn't sound like that to me. also, all of these reports of support, you know, i looked in the file. in there is something saying that she opposed it from the very beginning. the police at that time opposed it. i don't know whether they do now or not. what do you do -- he investigated me instead of the investigating the bar. he contacts the police and say do you know who these complaints were filed from? mostly i'm interested to see if they come from linda chapman and the residents
in the neighborhood. this is part of the character of the city. you can't encroach by building more and more higher and higher buildings. there was supposed to be a pre-application meeting. nothing. i went away for thanksgiving. i came back there was no notice. a neighbor sent me a xerox saying did you know there was a meeting about what was happening? i had no idea. there wasn't a meeting to discuss it and we were barely notified that, in fact, they were doing it. for these reasons i ask the planning commission to please put a stop to the project or at least to stop it right now for a moment so we can at least have a discussion with these people to have a coherent neighborhood again. thank you. >> hi, i'm judy sparing sparenger and i live within 300' of radius of 1856. i would like to reiterate that we have not had time to organize and speak to our neighbors that probably don't know this is happening yet. i feel that it is -- i have owned a number of buildings in the city by the way and still do. i feel that it's unfair for a building owner to be able to increase the value of his or her prope
and they were here in august when we did our exercise with the city. fema is well represented and we have several defense coordinating officers here over the past couple of days. certainly the california national guard is represented heavily here. obviously they are going to be the first guys to respond to a disaster and they have several interesting roles not only from a state perspective but as they get federalized or with the dual status commander managing federal response and federal authorities of military authorities flowing in. and most significantly, we're represented today with the commander of northern command, general jackoby. as you know, defense report to civil authorities is not a primary mission area for the department of defense. we have codified it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an are
, and you do, one that the cities and counties and states should be proud of. because they get it. they get it out here. but the hospitals, they will have to figure it out. but what if you are a country and all of a sudden you have an earthquake and by the way the one thing you need most because of that earthquake, the hospital infrastructure, is gone. can we describe a scenario that could be like that? i remember when i was in college a popular thing was the national lampoon and they did a parody of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do?
attending city college and taking courses from there. we ve
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